SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES

AP US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS All Academies

This one semester course will prepare students to successfully complete the Advanced Placement exam in United States Government and Politics. It will provide a learning experience equivalent to a college introductory course in political science. The course is open to 11th or 12th grade students who have high academic standing, superior academic achievement in social studies courses, and strong proficiency in writing and analytical reasoning. Students will complete extensive reading and analytical writing assignments. Exam review sessions and special learning activities will be offered in addition to regularly scheduled class instruction. United States government and politics will be studied from both analytical and critical perspectives. Students will learn the structure and function of American government and the institutions, groups, individuals, and processes that shape public policy. Content areas to be studied include federalism, separation of powers, the political beliefs and behaviors of individuals, political parties and interest groups, the Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, the federal judiciary, civil rights and liberties, and the relationship between economics and government.


AP MACROECONOMICS (MBCC) Academy of Business and Hospitality

AP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination; it also develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts


AP MICROECONOMICS (MBCC) Academy of Business and Hospitality

AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts


AP US HISTORY All Academies

This course will prepare students to take the Advanced Placement United States History exam. It will provide a learning experience equivalent to a two-semester college survey course. Students will study the history of the United States from the founding of the thirteen English colonies to the present from both analytical and critical perspectives as well as gain insights and an understanding of the various beliefs, philosophies, and movements, which have shaped this nation. In order to accomplish these goals, students will be expected to complete extensive reading of both articles and original documents. (Recommended prerequisite: C or better World History)


CURRENT EVENTS (DHS, EFHS) All Academies

A one semester Social Studies elective in which students will study and discuss the origins and causes of the current issues of today from our state, across the nation & around the world. Through the use of articles, newscasts, and other research tools, students will investigate social, political, economic, religious, and cultural events, while trying to predict the possible outcomes of these issues


LINK CREW (EFHS, FHS) All Academies

This course will:

1. Continue the goals and ideals of Link Crew in an organized class form.

2. Provide for individual student growth in leadership and project management.

3. Support the Academy teachers and students in succeeding academically and behaviorally.

4. Model and mentor future Link Leaders and assist in building initiatives.


SOCIAL JUSTICE All Academies

This course is designed to introduce students to social justice issues and assist them in discovering their ability to create positive change in their own world. Students will critically analyze various social movements related to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and other topics students bring up. Students will explore and discuss how these concepts influence human understanding, relationships, and behavior looking at a historical, political and social lens. Students will understand how individuals operate within community contexts created through interactions and relationships structured by sociability, belonging and responsibility. This course will encourage students to think critically and expansively about the social world and the conditions of humanity. Social justice will provide a foundation for students to explore social justice concepts, issues, and remedies, thereby developing the necessary analytical tools and information to see inequality and injustice and address historical and contemporary issues relevant to students’ present-day lives.


SOCIOLOGY All Academies

This is a one semester course which introduces the student to a disciplined imaginative analysis of the social world. The course focuses on basic social institutions and contemporary issues. Emphasis will be on an inductive in-depth study of the process of socialization and social stratification. In addition, stress will also be placed on the student application of sociological principles and concepts.


PSYCHOLOGY All Academies

This is a one semester survey course intended to familiarize students with psychological terminology, research methodology, experimentation, and other psychological areas which affect the students as an individual within society. The course also examines different aspects of psychology such as perceptions, values and personality, and explores how they might affect the behavior of individuals in society.


.U.S. ECONOMICS

Students will learn about the structure, function, principles, and problems of the American economy. Fundamental concepts of both macroeconomics and microeconomics will be introduced. A study of the nature of economics and the basic economic problem will form the basis for a systematic analysis of supply and demand, the factors of production, economic instability, the forms of business organization, labor relations, and the effect of government regulation. Special emphasis will be given to the role of government in the American economic system and the use of monetary and fiscal policies to achieve economic stability. Students will have the opportunity to use their substantive knowledge and social science skills to critically examine current economic problems.


U.S. GOVERNMENT

This is a one semester course describing the forms and functions of national, state and local governments in the United States. In this course, students will learn about the structure, principles, and ideals of the American system of government. An understanding of comparative political systems and the fundamental principles of American government will form the basis for a detailed analysis of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government. Special emphasis will be given to a critical study of the Constitution and fundamental civil liberties in the Bill of Rights. Students will have the opportunity to use their substantive knowledge and social science skills to critically examine current public policy issues. The student will be able to compare and contrast our system of government with other major political systems in the world today. Students will learn the importance of individual participation in our democratic society.


U.S. HISTORY and GEOGRAPHY 1, 2

First semester’s course is a survey of American History from 1865 to 1920. Areas of study include the Reconstruction period, the westward movement, the industrial era, the growth of organized labor, political reform, the Progressive era, the impact of immigration, the growth of cities, the Spanish-American War, and the role of the United States in World War I. A topical approach is used to explore political, economic, social, and cultural developments. The influence of geography on historical events is also analyzed. Students will increase their knowledge of historical events and deepen their understanding of our American heritage.

Second semester’s course is a survey of American history from 1920 to the present. Areas of study include the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, the New Deal, the role of the United States in World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, the changing lifestyles of the 1950's, political and social leaders in the 1960's, the Vietnam War, and the domestic and international challenges faced by the United States during the 1970's and 1980's. A topical approach is used to explore political, economic, social, and cultural developments. The influence of geography on historical events is also analyzed. Students will learn how the mistakes and triumphs of America’s past shape our perceptions of current problems and our vision for America’s future.


U.S. HISTORY THROUGH FILM (DHS, EFHS) All Academies

In this one semester course, students will study specific periods and events in U.S. History through the use of modern movies. The class will allow and challenge students to go beyond the use of a textbook to learn about American History. Students will watch and evaluate movies for their historical accuracy and educational value.


WORLD HISTORY and GEOGRAPHY 1, 2

World History and Geography takes a global and comparative approach to studying the world and its past to develop a greater understanding of the development of worldwide events, processes, and interactions among the world’s people, cultures, societies, and environment. Students will investigate our diverse and common traditions, and work to understand the complex interactions among various environmental, human and social forces that have influenced and continue to influence us. Studying World History and Geography connects us to people and events across time and space, illuminating the range and depth of human experience on grand as well as local scales.